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A Kindergarten-First-Grade Curriculum Forgotten Books

A Kindergarten-First-Grade Curriculum

Forgotten Books

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331381501
Paperback
84 pages
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 About the Book 

Excerpt from A Kindergarten-First-Grade CurriculumThe need for a first-grade curriculum based upon the work of the modern kindergarten has been frequently expressed, and the curriculum here presented is an effort to meet that need. It follows theMoreExcerpt from A Kindergarten-First-Grade CurriculumThe need for a first-grade curriculum based upon the work of the modern kindergarten has been frequently expressed, and the curriculum here presented is an effort to meet that need. It follows the Kindergarten Curriculum which was published as a Bureau of Education bulletin in 1919 and is organized on the same general principle and the same plan. It is intended primarily for two groups of people - first-grade teachers of children who have had a year of kindergarten work, and kindergarten-primary supervisors who wish to organize the work of the kindergarten and primary grades on the same principle. This curriculum should also have value for kindergarten teachers by showing them how their work functions as a preparation for that which is to follow. Those who use this curriculum should have the Kindergarten Curriculum at hand for reference, since the work suggested for the first grade is based 011 that described in the Kindergarten Curriculum. The committee which prepared the present curriculum took pains not to repeat what had been given in the former one.The kindergarten-first-grade Curriculum has been prepared in the hope that it will help to strengthen the work of the schools at a point that needs material strengthening - the work at the beginning. The fact that such weakness exists is shown by the appalling number of failures in the first grade - one in every four in the average city throughout the country. There are several reasons for this weakness, some of which are administrative and can not be discussed here. One of the chief reasons, however, is found in the character of the curriculum. This is too often the traditional curriculum, barren of content, and dealing only with the tools of learning. Such a curriculum for first-grade children, however, lags far behind current educational thought. A modern curriculum for this grade has a thought content based upon childrens interests and experiences, which motivates their activities and calls for the use of the school arts - language, reading, number, and manual activities - us forms of expression. Such a curriculum, in fact, implies the project type of education.The kind of education here indicated has been accepted as the true type for children of kindergarten age- and the recognition of the period from 4 to S years as psychologically one involved the indorsement of this type for the early primary grades also. The changes now in progress in the direction of a more vital type of education in these grades serve as evidence of that indorsement. The changes needed to work out the ideas involved in the term the kindergarten primary unit have been made in some cities and are in process in many others. The beginnings are still far from what they should be on the whole, however, because the changes from the formal academic type of the past to the more vital type which present-day educational theory calls for have not become sufficiently general. To bring this change about is the outstanding problem in early elementary education. It has received and is receiving thoughtful attention from several groups of people. Among these is the National Council of Primary Education. The advocates of the project method constitute another group.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com