Home » La Hija de La Puta y Otros Cuentos by Richard Russo
La Hija de La Puta y Otros Cuentos Richard Russo

La Hija de La Puta y Otros Cuentos

Richard Russo

Published
ISBN : 9788495908698
Paperback
213 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

In The Whores Child, Richard Russos first collection of short fiction, the 2002 Pulitzer Prize-wining author of Empire Falls explores difficult emotional territory while retaining the assured wisdom and humor of his best work. Infidelity,MoreIn The Whores Child, Richard Russos first collection of short fiction, the 2002 Pulitzer Prize-wining author of Empire Falls explores difficult emotional territory while retaining the assured wisdom and humor of his best work. Infidelity, self-reflection, and the fallibility of memory come into consideration in this entertaining and perceptive collection. The books titular story sets the tone for the whole: an elderly nun crashes a college writing workshop and composes her own life story, sharing the details of her childhood growing up in a convent as the abandoned daughter of a prostitute. As her troubling story unfolds, the class realizes the fictions she has unknowingly imposed upon it. Other stories examine familial relationships and responsibility: the bittersweet Joyride follows the desperate road trip of a mother and son, each running from troubles they wont admit to. The collections best and most lighthearted story, The Mysteries of Linwood Hart, explores the daydreaming, curious mind of 10-year-old Linwood as he ponders the self-defeating behavior of his family, the desires of inanimate objects, and his perceived place at the center of the universe. Russo surveys these subjects with skilled ease and accuracy, communicating a quiet understanding of his characters and their personal yet universal concerns. Russo, like Flannery OConnor, has a gift for conveying the absurdity and severity of everyday life with brutal honesty, humor, and compassion: It was an awful place, but Lin understood it was as perfectly real as every place else in the world, which was large beyond imagining, containing every single place he himself had ever been or never would see in his entire life. Uncommon in its natural insight, The Whores Child recognizes the often unwelcome realities of experience and is all the more exceptional for it. --Ross Doll